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are the numbers to use if you are a student or a graduate. -- you are a parent, - use for educators and administrators, the number is -- please make sure you meet thae - mute the tv when you call in. hasg tag, @cspan. our facebook poll has been up for a number of hours. you can go to facebook.com/c- span. is college worth going into debt? let's go to new york and hear from marian wang. she is the education reporter for propublica joining us byvia skype. >> thank you for having me. >> what got you interested in the area of student debt? >> there are record numbers for student debt. i began covering education. i got sucked into it. so much is happening in that space. there are hard economic times that is putting an extra crunch on students and families at a time and college costs keep rising. >> we showed audiences the -- the conversation you participated in a couple of months ago. the scope of the issue and the size of the student debt that we are dealing with these days. >> the government issued more than a hundred billion dollars in student loans to families and grad students and p
because educated women refused to allow they're sons to fight in theal bonn. you have a less educated mother here. single parent in the difficult system. the higher education a women has the more likely her son is to go on with education rather than getting into violence and drugs and certainly she won't condone her son getting into a gang or drugs. i've sometimes been criticized for that because they say all the 911 hijackers were educated and had university degrees and that certainly is true. but nobody botherd to check they're mothers and nearly all of them were i late rate an illiterate. exciting news and then i have to unfortunately talk to you about negative news. i've been in perhaps 120 cities over the past 14 months talking to maybe 50,000 people and i ask this question most places i go and i'll ask you today. how many of you are aware of the fact in afghanistan today, there's 5 point 2 million children going to school and 1 point 8 million of those are female and in 2000 there was only 8 hundred 6,000 kids in school. how many of you know that fact? one, two, you? s
, a colleague, a fellow professional educator defined my professional path. when i recalled this dismissal in those two sentences, i am reminded of the thing that (inaudible) in the intervening years. however these 12 words are not only enough to express the challenges that my team and i have faced, but they stand for our triumphs as well. despite a skeptical and hostile environment, we survived. starting in the 80s with just 25 students started as the first chinese public school opened in san francisco in 1985. as i remember, i remember the quote, which would you teach chinese to them? i try to recall that and to what my colleague said has grown from a small pocket of multi-ethnic students to a student body comprised of many diverse socioeconomic backgrounds. i try to recall how hard we fought, administrator and parents and students and teachers alike. and what we each sacrificed to be be where -- to be where we are today. today i am humbled by my students who excel in two languages and our students are asked to demonstrate their chinese skills. today our graduates go to beijing, china t
's- ways to fight tear riz m with education but i said i do this to promote peace and i started 8 years before 911 and this is about promoting peace through education. i've worked afghanistan and pakistan many years and i said we need to have a tribal council. i went to manhattan in the fall of 2005 and the big boss of the whole group, nancy shepherd and carlin coburn in publicity. we met in a little room and i stated my case and they said, this is your first book so you need to listen to a few things here. first of all only 12 percent of nonfiction books make a profit and 2/3 are pre chosen by the publisher. we'd like to put our marketing arm behind us but your having to fight tear riz m to this. since i grew up in africa and worked pakistan for many years you never settle a deal without driving a hard bargain so i said if the hard cover doesn't do well, i'd like the subtitle changed later on for the paper back. julia and our other board relently pounded away month after month. i was in pakistan of december of 2006 and there was a new editor on the book and they said they decided to c
that the board, the rules committee and the board of education it remains in the process of re-examining all of our policies. on which the rules of board is one section. that's why the format looks change. and not throughout here, and we are still in the process of doing that, and just to reiterate there are sections that we assigned to various committees not the rules committee. and the grounds commission and the curriculum section to the curriculum committee, etc.. and we hope to complete that this year. >> thank you, any other comments from the board? roll call. >> ly. >> yes. >> wong. >> yes. >> fewer. >> yes. >> haney. >> yes. >> mendoza. >> yes. dr. murase. >> aye. >> norton. >> aye. >> wynns. >> seven ayes. >> now we proceed to the annual election of officers for the board of education. as a reminder to the board and public, this election is by voice vote. and we do not need a second, and it's permisable for a member to vote for themselves. good to know. board members you will vote by name. if only one nomination, or more than you vote by aye or nay. i declare that the floor is open f
more serious education marketing campaign. we've got to educate everybody using our streets. so, we're choosing today in the middle of the beginning of our holiday season with everybody's attention on having great fun, having wonderful events, having serious sales that allow people to shop, this is where the consciousness has to be risen. and, so, in light of this, we picked this day and this time and this area of year to make this announcement that we have a pedestrian strategy that's going on, a serious one. we're jointly doing it with the collaboration of all the different departments. we have asked and part of the strategy will be our police department, really doing a lot more enforcement strategically in all the areas that we need to, with not only stops, not only enforcement and ticketing, but a serious effort to remind people that these are going to be spots where we are going to pay a lot more attention. we have the mta, with ed's leadership and his staff, parking and traffic and others, working to do some of the physical improvements that remind everybody that we emphasize
telling to your member of congress. >> two other things. on the department of education side think they will work on the mess, and hope we do a better job with the servicers reining in the problems. it is important that they have it is important that they have been hearing about this problem so much. that is one thing that does not require congressional action. another thing is the consumer financial protection bureau is sort of the new game in town as far as this goes. people do not think of them as a federal student loan side, they primarily have jurisdiction over private student loans. there will be quite active, talking about some of the predatory practices, but even on the federal student loan side the consumer financial protection bureau has jurisdiction over debt collectors and some of the servicers. it is not the biggest picture issues we have been talking about so much, but on the ground for people right now who have already borrowed, clients like mine having the existing programs that work well, it is incredibly important. hopefully a lot is going to happen in that area.
in our community to support nonlaw enforcement efforts to reduce violence, whether it's education, social services, housing, none of that escapes us as to their link in efforts to reduce violence in our society. with that i want to thank everybody for coming today. and i would ask everyone in san francisco, if not the whole region and the state, to please join us in a national moment of silence that will occur tomorrow morning east coast time, it will be 9:30 a.m., and here in san francisco it will be 6:30 a.m. for a national moment of silence to remember all the victims in sandy hook. of course, at the same time, remember all the victims at our own locally it victims of gun violence. and before and after this moment of silence we will be active doing the things we need to do to reduce violence in our city. thank you. >> okay, good morning. thank you all for coming out today. we're very happy to be here. my name is ed rifkin, i'm the other ed, director of transportation. and as the transportation director, i oversee the sfmta which is the agency that is charged with implementing the city'
, education, and leadership. our president is one of the co-chairs of the council. it is my great pleasure to introduce him this evening. he is a scholar, advocate, and a true friend of afghanistan. pls -- [applause] >> thank you very much for that introduction and your work as vice chair of the u.s. afghan women's council. i wish to thank the members from the delegation from afghanistan, u.s. afghan women's council and all of our guests from around the world for joining us this evening. it is a privilege to welcome back to georgetown the president of afghanistan hamid karzai. we look forward to hearing his remark on afghanistan beyond 2014, a perspective on afghan-u.s. relations. 2014 will be an historic year for afghanistan as it will witness elections across the country and the end of u.s. and isaf combat operations. as president obama, secretary of state clinton and many of this room have emphasized this transition provides us with the opportunity for diplomatic and cultural relations between our peoples. at georgetown, we are proud to be a part of this critical work notably through th
. issues i care about, really care about. education has always been very center to the things i have been involved with. i am a former teacher also. i work in the early childhood education field for 18 years running an organization. those are parts of my dna. other things that people are not aware of, i do care about health environment in san francisco. i want to make sure that we have enough health facilities to serve all san francisco, not just one part of the city. i want to make sure that our small businesses are supported. why? i come from a family where we had a small grocery store. i understand what it means to run a small business. maybe people think about 500 people is a small business. i'm talking about businesses that drive neighborhoods, support neighborhoods, give jobs to people in those neighborhoods. i want to work with others on the board of supervisors to improve the conditions support them , and make them thrive. those are some of the things, education, the economy. now that we are through the downturn, and dealt with the cuts, we want to make sure that is we impr
for them to be educated. they want to be educated. we worked out some of the plans for -- because i met with the college trustees and i will be meeting with them again on thursday. there are a lot of promises have been made to the trustees about what puc would do, but nothing has been done. and what i'm here is to talk about -- to see that things get started because school starts next monday. and i've asked one of the trustees to come and speak with you also on public comment. and the other concern that i have, great concern, is that the college itself. the college had 33,000 square feet of space when they opened up in 1986. now, because of some politicking and playing went on, they are down to 17,000 feet, square feet. that college should be all 33,000 square feet for the classes that we had that was given to other colleges. and the programs are coming back. i've talked with of the trustees and they are willing and their sending some of our programs back, and they all are coming back and we want an addition of services in my community because they cannot go outside of the area. so, wha
agreement, both will be held on january 22, 2013. discussion of other educational, issues none. and item n, none. item o, we will vote on the calendar for one item that was severed. roll call. >> ly. >> yes. >> wong. >> yes. >> fewer. yes. >> haney. >> yes. >> maufas. >> yes. >> murase. >> yes. >> wynns. >> aye. >> item p, consent calendar resolutions, this our audit, 2-c, and our auditor is in the audience. >> i first want to congratulate president norton and vice president fewer, on your new titles. we have with us tonight leonard dana, to give you a short presentation on our 2011-12 audit. the company has done our audits for six or seven years now. and mr. dana has been a partner on this for three years now i think. >> i am on my second go around. >> exactly. >> usually when we present the audit reports, we usually have a lot to talk about. because of the findings. but i went back and looked at prior reports. and i didn't find one that didn't have one comment in them. and some comments if you go back in time, they are more than ticky-tack items, they were fairly serious items. and it sh
will be spent on education. >> reporter: it has been a long time that the governor unveiled a budgewit a surplus -- budget with a surplus. he says now is not the time to spend but it includes billions more for education. k-12 will receive $2.7 billion more. but that money will be distributed to poor communities. >> growing up in compton is not like it is to grow up in beverly hills. we recognize that. >> we applaud the governor in all he is doing to restore the funds that has been taken away from schools. >> reporter: not all of the funds for education have been restored and now republicans say schools are not getting as much as taxpayers expected. >> itthere is -- there is not the level expressed in the campaign. >> reporter: higher education will receive more money, half a billion dollars. but the governor says that higher education will have to change the way it spends money to cut costs to avoid higher student fees. in sacramento, ken pritchett, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> today we asked the leaders what they think about the governor's new funding formula and how it could impact their schools.
of equal access to quality education for all of its students. effectiveness of core substit e substitutes could be improved if their jobs were assigned no later than the night before. that was always practiced before previous years. currently jobs are assigned on the morning of the assignment. despite all reasonable efforts to reach the sights on time. it may be that we arrive late, this creates stress for the school staff and disrupts the student's learning routine. thank you. >> good evening commissioners. congratulations president norton and vice president fewer. and good evening superintendent. my name is darlene ania, and i am here today in my capacity as vice president of substitutes with uesf. i wish to direct attention to a problem that has impacted our students and schools for the entire fall semester. though initial steps have been taken to remedy this situation, i believe that this is an important issue which should be kind of spotlighted right now. so we don't have this same problem next year. the problem is an i.t. problem. the system was not inputting critical information on
not addressing the costs of education at all. it is about increasing government funding to help students go to school. we need to be focusing on and we need to be focusing on what are the costs that can be reduced to bring these costs down, make schools more competitive, so students have a competitive choice of which university to go to. >> we will let you go, as we hear from traunch mitchell. -- josh mitchell. >> a lot of schools are starting to increase things at a faster pace. i think there is so much scrutiny these days. it is kind of like health care. why are costs rising? i think they're going to start to see a lot of pressure from congress to rein in their costs. >> josh mitchell writes for "the wall street journal," and thanks for spending the last half hour with us. >> yes. >> and we appreciate all of your phone calls, comments on twitter, and the conversation continues online, and the question we have been asking is, how much debt is worth going into college? [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013
and features an increase in spending for education, transportation, and even a rainy day fund. cbs 5 reporter grace lee joins us with how this is beginning of a new era. >> reporter: budget chair senator mark leno called this budget a breath of fresh air after so many tough years of cutting back it's a different proposal that we're hearing. but the governor says this is knots the time to start spending wildly and is giving more money to schools but the way he wants to do it is already causing waves. >> drizzle... >> reporter: in the city of richmond, perry's elementary school has 600 students. every, single one on reduced or free lunch. and after years of cutting back, they have learned they will get more money under the new budget. >> we are thrilled with lower class sizes enhance the educational experience by actually having an extra period. so maybe they can have a music program play an instrument. they can actually do art, drama, more lits racy. >> reporter: the plan proposes to spend $56 billion on k-12 schools adding an additional $2 billion
a little more sleep can improve student health and education. the school board wonders if this idea will and to be expensive. >> seven 17 a.m. that is when school begins and anne arundel county. according to research, it is the early as wake up all in the state. heather leads the group start school later, which now has chapters in many states. she is petitioning to the school board with signatures to let students sleep in a bit longer. >> we know the health impacts of sleep approbation that the kids are experiencing. it is quite experience. some of the long-term impacts are not know. >> bus pickup times can be as early as i 50 a.m. that is dark in the winter. that is a safety issue. >> no student should be on a bus earlier than 7 a.m. and not earlier than 8 a.m. in a classroom. dr. owen says it is well- documented that in adolescents body chemistry affects their sleep. >> there is a natural shift in wake and sleep time that is associated with problems of teenagers getting to sleep much before 11 p.m. they simply cannot small -- they cannot fall asleep. >> high school as an middle sc
of education have spoken again and again about the loss of one of their students. the high school basketball player committed suicide last month. in a note, he said his coach had physically punished him repeatedly. the student said the violence escalated last september after he became team captain. he told his mother in december about a prolonged beating he said he suffered following a practice match. the next day, he killed himself. the mayor of osaka, who's also a lawyer, has condemned the board of education and the school. he is promising a thorough investigation. >> translator: beating someone 30 or 40 times is unpardonable. this is not short of a crime. if it really happened, this can be considered an assault case. >> reporter: japanese law bans physical punishment at schools but ministry of education statistics show it happens just the same. hundreds of teachers across the country have been reprimanded in the past decade for using corporal punishment. in the 2011-2012 school year, 108 of 404 cases happened at sports clubs. the basketball team at the high school in question has made a n
? that they will be fine, that they will survive? i think we can all agree when we began our careers in education, we did it because children deserved better. to thrive and placed in situations to be successful. our jobs. mine, yours, are to remove those obstacles in front of them. and to do our best to give them that path to success. moving this will place a major obstacle in their way. these are students that have dealt with years of ada construction. and last year there was a fire and they were without a cafeteria and not to mention lost every book in the library. they have had to endure so much. and those who could help, and you are about to throw a huge obstacle in our way. i ask is this the best you can do? have you consulted with all parties? are you proud of the work you have done, and the decisions you are about to make? in my opinion unless you have received the answers that you are satisfied with, then you hand the work back to them and say, try again. [applause] >> good evening, i am melissa, the president of the board of creative arts charter school. i appreciate the opportunity to give comm
that the education system must instill the value of strong minds and that brings strong change. take your child to school. meet your child's teachers. exchange numbers. turn the tv off at night. take a report card every nine weeks and take your child to religious celebration once a week. most of the violence is from the bottom up, not top down. mothers say something like "i'm going to beat you boy. i'm going to beat you so the police don't have to do it one day". it was their own way of saying get some home training, some home cultivation is a big fact in the social order and we must restore homes but unemployed parents don't do as good job as parents with jobs. i'm all about welfare back to work. there are four steps involved. one the parents must have day care. if you leave the child without day care you're called an unfit parent and are arrested. you need day care. you need transportation and job training and a job. you need those four steps. what gives you an advantage in san francisco with the mayor across the bay and mayor lee here you have leaders that care. we have leaders h
for education certainly. annette has more now from sacramento governor brown says the budget deficit has been wiped out. and per pupil spending will go up almost 2700 dollars by 2016 under controversial proposal to give schools more money if they have higher numbers of low income and non-english speaking students. >> growing up in compton or richmond is not like it is to grow up in los gatos or beverly history or piedmont. >>reporter: higher education will see bump of 2000 dollars or so per student in the same time period. all thanks to rebounding economy and california voters for approving the tax hike under proposition 30 last november. >> they voted for the tax measure. putting money natural schools as i said but we are also not going to play the game of spending money we didn't vishtion the budget plan includes 1 billion dollar rainy day fund while democrat like the blue print proposal also drew cautious praise from republic kaichbilitys i think the governor deserves credit for advance ago budget plan that gemly imposes fiscal restraint when we need it. >>reporter: some were disappoi
. when i grow up, i want to be a professor in biotechnology. >> the education ministry says there too overburdened for such causes and they want schools to focus mainly on religion, nationalism, the indonesian language, and math. that would mean the end of signs causes so they could learn about their country's frequent earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. >> they are the right age to learn. they are ready to learn the basic concepts of science. what about their future? >> fascinated to listen to listen to the explanation about the many volcanoes. science is important to learn the way of thinking. they say it is necessary for them to be able to compete internationally. indonesia's's booming economy is growing more than 6% per year and they urgently need to educate their young regeneration. compared with neighboring countries, they have few scientists add that not many can afford to study abroad. >> we cannot rely on a small group. we need a critical mass of educated, sophisticated middle class in the nation's the will work together on a vision of what this country should be. >> business
of our board of education, -- mendoza. with that, mr. mayor, would like to join us? (applause) >> i would like to give our mayor the opportunity to say a few words on today's occasion. >> thank you everybody. happy new year! i wanted to be here the congratulate the supervisors who have been reelected, as well as the new elected supervisors and to welcome those families and friends who have come along way i'm sure, whether working with the newly elected, or alongside all of us for many years. i want to acknowledge the public officials that have been identified in the commissioners and department heads, for being here today. a sincere congratulations to board president chiu for you nomination in your reelection as board president. i look forward to working with you and with the whole board to continue the success of our city and to make sure that the dialogue but we have just heard, whether the celebration that supervisor yee had last night or london had today - sorry, supervisor breed, we are all still calling ourselves each by our first names - we continue making sure that the
education. i want to thank you for that. i want to introduce my family. i'm getting emotional. first off my beautiful wife karen cepeda [sounds like]. (applause) together we have two kids, renee and emiliana who are in school today. we have been through what close couples go through in terms of raising kids and facing adversity and figuring out how to make a household work. it has been wonderful 15 years. my mom is year, linda parks and stepfather. (applause) i think that what i really got % most of all from my mom % is really how to think and be thoughtful about the people. and i take that with me wherever i go. i draw inspiration from being around people. i want to say thank you for my life and what you have given me. my stepfather joe has given me a great opportunity, never expected that and i want to thank you for that. i wanted to do is my dad, hector avalos. it's time for resemblance i tihnk, for the gray look. my dad is important to me as well and taught me about the value of work. working with other people and not just yourself. my sister is here, carol avalos who is a nu
, we are well trained. we do not come out there as police officers. we are into education and training. we are not looking to enforce. we tried to instill the idea that the security plan is paramount, providing the framework by which an establishment protect itself from inappropriate behavior and criminal acts for a working relationship with the community and the police. there is that umbrella of security and personnel. we looked at the management to hire the appropriate personnel. hiring, training, and supervision. everything that you need. all of our problems come from the over service of alcohol. we ask for owners to train for over service. we also look for physical security measures, like scanning. additional parking and security of the exterior is important. we think that an ongoing plan management -- constantly as cds nightclub owners assessing management. it is readjusted when necessary. the bottom line is they have a great security plan and they will limit their liability. it is all about making money and defending yourself against liability. that is what we try to preach to cl
at the deficit problem. it gives $2.7 billion from education through kindergarten through community college. the systems will get an additional $250 million each. it expands healthcare under the healthcare reform and leaves a billion dollars in reserve. the governor's plan to increase public education funding also includes social engineering, poorer districts will get more than other ones. david louie has more. >> west contra costa knows hardship. they got a $46 million bailout and laid off teachers long before the budget crisis. now it has paid off the loan it is getting a shot in the arm. in announcing $2.7 billion in increased funding for public education. >> in richmond, it's not like growing up in los gatos or beverly hills. >> they want to give those hire amounts. julie says it's critical because 70% of the 30,000 students are minority, some of them are still learning english. >> you have to understand that education is the foundation for everything. without that money, without that foundation, we're going to see problems in the future. so fixing it now helps. >> reporter: school dist
are truly prosperous. you can see the web sites. they take into account opportunity, education, health, personal safety, and other categories. the idea being it is that does the money but how happy you are. having introduced that index, i don't agree with its findings. we rank 12th out of 142 nations. take a look at where we have high marks. health. it surprised me until i read the offer -- office considered lobbying and public spending. education, the authors say quality of and access to schools is contributing mightily to prosperity. governance, number ten. presumably the data was tallied 04 of congress dithered. another number ten rating as what that study called social capital. with the authors mean by that is just social cohesion. family and community ties that contribute to well-being. the study in the following performance, and this mystified me. the economy. the highest gdp in the world, but the authors of the -- also greeted us on unemployment and personal savings rates. entrepreneur real ship with, we scored low. frankly, this is one i simply don't get since starting a busine
is how does it treats its women. does it educate that half of the population? does it give an opportunity? when it does, you will police the power of everyone, -- you unleash the power of everyone, not just some, and there was great wisdom in afghanistan ratifying a constitution that recognizes that appeared that should be part of the legacy of these last 10 years. thank you very much, everybody. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> also this afternoon, vice president biden continuing his meetings today comeuppance together a response to last month's shootings at the connecticut elementary school. he is meeting this afternoon with representatives of the video game industry. he said yesterday he will have recommendations to the president next week. we want to hear again from hamas karzai this afternoon. he will be at georgetown university talking about the future of u.s.-afghan relations. that is live at 5:30 eastern on cnn. u.s. army colonel michael meese spoke earlier this week about kevin terrorism. he is a f
it is about fully funding education. we've had four or five years of basically grotesquely underfunded schools so every kid wins as a result of this. >> the back at the elementary school, the money can't come soon enough. >> it definitely is more of a challenge to bring them along without funding to support activities and programs that would help benefit english learners. without those programs, it is harder to bring them along. >> it is fair. it's right. and it's just. >> now, administrators aren't about to go all-in just yet. they know this is only the proposed budget and they're waiting to find out more when the revised comes out. i'm arturo santiago, nbc bay area news. >> the budget has very good news for higher education. we'll break down the numbers straight ahead. >> also, destruction from san francisco to l.a. the new warning about an earthquake scenario that was once thought to be impossible. >> why a science teacher is being hailed a hero after a new school shooting in southern california. >> and what happened? the deadly accident that burned a bay area hillside and shut down a major
. he challenged u.s. power and made friends with enemies. among the educated middle class, he is profoundly unpopular, hated by many and even feared. that oncologist in the country's leading cancer clinic says that violent crime has swept of venezuela. >> a number of my colleagues go around in vehicles, very scared for their lives. every week, one of my friends' families is hit by a kidnapper. that is the terror that we live in. >> in the face of his loyalty, the opposition seems weekend. they dropped their demand for fresh elections and called off a rival demonstration of their own. for now, there is no power vacuum. despite his absence. >> for more on his health, i am joined by the one who formerly served as the director of the central bank. he is so reviled here in washington and you see those people turning out for an inauguration where he is not present and this is not in north korea situation where there are forced in, they really love him. >> his talent is the ability to connect with the people and that he is taking care of their interests. and without him, they would b
spent 16 years in women education i applaud women going forward. i don't look like a person of color but if you look at my freckles i consider myself a person of color too. i have worked in district 3, closely with many supervisors. welcome to supervisor yee and breed, welcome aboard. this is a great group. in this me very proud to be a san franciscan, and to call him my supervisor. thank you very much. >> president: next speaker. >> good afternoon and happy new year to you all. it is a pleasure to be here. my name is mattie scott, the founder of healing for our families and our nation, working hard in san francisco over the last 16 years to stop senseless violence. i lost my youngest son to gun violence in 1996, july 17th. we have been ever since trying to educate the leaders, our children, law enforcement, the board of supervisors and everyone present so that we do have one of the situation. i am happy that my district supervisor, london breed, who grew up where my son was killed 16 years ago, is my supervisor for district 5. welcome london. i appreciate the work that yo
to educction week" magazine. it'ssthe fifth consecutivv year for the top honor.but some education experts are qqestioning that ranking..- ranking.of course - governor o'malley is celebrating he state's staaus. he visitedd with teachers and studdntt today at jones elementary school in severna park. o'malley says he's ppouu of the schools - and the pprents who've bn involved.but crittcs say state leaaers are schools rather than promoting grades and graduation rates. state investments in education was among heetop ccittria for still has a significant achievement gap mong minnrity and low-income students. 3 <"wwen you look at the entire state from kenttcounty to prince george's county... can barely read, write, spell nd do matt ppoficiently.">>- proficiently."> theegoveenor addits there's still work to do... bt says teachers, students and parents achievement. 3 that brings us to our question 3 maryland schools are the best in the nation? nation? 3 head to facebook and search pox 45. like our page then day to see what parrntt aae saying about our schools. 3
. the budget includes a $2 billion increase in funding for k-12 education. but not all districts will get the same amount of money. in fact, the governor pointed to two bay area school systems to justify his decision to give more money to certain schools and less to others. nbc's arturo santiago joins us from piedmont. i can imagine this is already causing controversy. >> reporter: a bit of it, raj. the governor specifically mentioned richmond and piedmont, two distinctly different school districts but when it comes to what the governor is proposing for the k-12 funding, you'll get similar reactions from each one. now, at perrys elementary school in richmond, 100% of its students are on the free or reduced lunch program. now, this is the kind of school that the governor is trying to focus on. he just doesn't want to increase funding across the board. he wants to disproportionately fund the schools, like perrys that have disproportionate challenges. that would mean less funding for schools with fewer low-income or non-english speaking students. the educators i spoke to in both richmond and
brown's budget calls for increased funding for education, $2.7 million more and $250 million more to the csu and uc systems. the increase is made possible by voters who approved tax hikes under proper 30. he warned the surplus could disappear based on federal actions, cutting the national debt or healthcare costs. democrats say the plan mirrors their own but they are eyeing rebuilding the social safety net. >> we are in this middle ground area, no more cuts. >> reporter: the leader of the democrats in the senate pointed january is not may. in may the governor will release his budget which we could see the surplus disappeared or see that it has grown, in which cases democrats may restore afunding to social -- funding to social service cuts. ken pritchett,. >> reporter: >> more details. the state estimates it will have a surplus of $851 million. it drops down for 2014. but then it increases to 400 million the next year. it is projected at a billion dollars for the 2016 year. >> restore. rebuild. >> after governor jerry brown announced the plan protesters gathered at city hall. this
, education. especially to our youth, we have to educate them about what a concussion is. we don't have to be unconscious. less than 10% of concussions result in unconsciousness. so what the symptoms are. and then, two, when they have a concussion, know that it's okay not to play. if you don't feel complete, don't compete. if you don't feel right in the head, rest instead. i think that's the message that our youth needs to hear. that it's okay, that toughness is like a badge of honor, so it's understandable that they want to continue to play. but when it comes to the brain trauma, it's a completely different issue. >> right, you can replace a kneecap and move on, but you cannot do that with a brain. i want to add into the conversation. paul callan, our legal analyst, and david epstein. how significant are these findings when it comes to the nfl? there are 2,000 players who now have lawsuits against the nfl? is this something that could be do or die for the league? >> i think everybody sort of expected to see cte in junior seau. i think we sort of know that story, when somebody's played
for increased money to education, 2.7 billion to can through 12. the increase in education spending is made possible by voters who approved tax hikes in november under proposition 30. brown was quick to warn that the surplus could disappear based on federal actions such as cutting the national debt or increased health care costs. democrats who control the legislature say the governor's plan mirrors their own but they are eyeing rebuilding the social net. >> we're in this middle ground area. no more cuts but not sufficient moneys to make restoration. >> reporter: in sacramento, ken pritchett. >>> the governor's focus on education may come at the expense of some of the wealthiest school districts. the governor said the situation is different for people who grew up in oakland or compton than those growing up in piedmont. his proposal calls for pouring money into schools where students are learning english as a second language. >> disproportionally funding those schools that have disproportional challenges. >> reporter: wealthier schools could see cuts. the san mateo union school district says
thing. >> reporter: governor brown's budget does call for increased money to education, 2.7 billion to can through 12. the increase in education spending is made possible by voters who approved tax hikes in november under proposition 30. brown was quick to warn that the surplus could disappear based on federal actions such as cutting the national debt or increased health care costs. democrats who control the legislature say the governor's plan mirrors their own but they are eyeing rebuilding the social net. >> we're in this middle ground area. no more cuts but not sufficient moneys to make restoration. >> reporter: in sacramento, ken pritchett. >>> the governor's focus on education may come at the expense of some of the wealthiest school districts. the governor said the situation is different for people who grew up in oakland or compton than those growing up in piedmont. his proposal calls for pouring money into schools where students are learning english as a second language. >> disproportionally funding those schools that have disproportional challenges. >> reporter: wealthier sch
years and remained seller. let's take them one at the time. work first over education training. offering adult welfare recipients education and training may sound nice, but study after study has shown that it doesn't work. the key has been to require 100 percent engagement in work or work-life activity. in force consequences for families. in order to receive the government's cash assistance, welfare applicants or recipients have got show up and show us they're actively engaged in work or getting there and we will honor they are doing this. strong antifraud measures. welfare programs cannot be naive about the capacity of citizens to try to get it over on the system. we are not afraid to check asset and income, residency, and identity to be be sure the taxpayer funded benefits are going those who legitimate qualify. and performance-based contracts. we pay our not for profit private sector vendors. they were one of the fist social agency to use 100% performance-based contract to provide performance. and we continue do so today. now there is another element of our success that i want to give
in the education system and especiallied connected to the experience of a woman like maria montessori. the third principle is innovation and technology. when i say italy everybody will think of the arts and music. they don't think of technology yet we want to persuade you there are lots of things to be discovered. i was working in the world of energy and there i think we have taken enormous steps in the direction of a modern sustainable green economy, what we call now distributed generations of people producing and consuming energy. this is happening at an incredible pace in california and i know california like this is and we want to connect with california. some of the events will require the supports of the leaders that are here present, the leaders of the italian american associations. i am very proud to say that all of the leaders of the italian american associations are gathered today, mr. mayor, and senator assembly man and board of supervisors is here to celebrate with us and ramona blackwell who with the committee of the italians abroad and elected body and we will need your suppor
in spending for education, transportation, even a rainy day fund. cbs 5 reporter grace lee joins us from the newsroom and explains how the proposal represents the beginning of this new era, we hope. grace. >>> reporter: we have been talking about the bad times for so long it really is a new era. this is a governor who repeatedly has talked about fiscal discipline, even when things are starting to look good for california this year. so his message today is that that deficit may be gone but we still have a wall of debt to pay back from the hard years. and the biggest winner of his proposed budget plan, k-12 schools. after years of cuts, they are going to get $2.7 billion more next year and that number continues to rise so that by 2016 an extra $2700 per student per year will be spent here in california. now, the governor is not only adding money to public schools. he's also returning spending power back to the local level and one big beneficiary will be perry's elementary schoo in richmond. it's one of the poorest schools in the state with every child on
for education. nannette miranda is live in sacramento with more on this for us. >> reporter: if you look at just the state's general fund, things do look rosier but it doesn't account for the big debt that california has to pay back but the governor sees this as great progress. >> over here.... >> he says the budget deficit has been wiped out. and spending in kindergarten through 12th great will go up $2700 under a controversial proposal to give schools more money. >> growing up in richmond is not like it is growing up in los gatos or piedmont. >> higher education will see a bump of $2,000 per student in the same time period. all thanks to resounding economy and california voters for approving the tax hike under proposition 30 last november. >> they voted for the tax measure, we're putting money into schools as i said, but we're not going to play the game of spending money we don't have. >> reporter: in fact the $98 billion budget plan includes a billion dollar rainy day fund. proposal also drew cautious praise from republicans. >> i think the governor deserves credit for balancing a budget plan
. education is one of them. mental health at the top. you mentioned video games, television, movies, but the two most contributing factors are the availability of assault weapons, and the availability of these multiple clips of ammunition. those are the two that most demand action. yes, we might have to take a look at some self restraint among those who make the video games, but not as much as we need to take a look at regulating these manufacturing of these weapons of war. and that includes the first time anybody wants into a movie theater with an ipad or video game, and blows up 30 people. that has never happened and never will. >> jennifer: the shooter at the high school in california, he had a shotgun. >> uh-huh. >> jennifer: now he didn't kill 20 people because he had a shotgun. nor did he kill himself, he was disarmed by a teacher who used her words and not a weapon to have him put down his weapon. if he had an assault rifle, or if the teacher had a gun there would have been an entirely different outcome, so bottom line is, availability is a huge -- i
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